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Happy Hour!

Join our affiliates this Thursday!

 

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PKN & Drinks x Design

Call for Presenters

 

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2014 BC&RC Events

CEU Seminars

 

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AIAD Latest Articles

The Introduction of the NDSA

Architects Laud Introduction of Bipartisan National Design Services Act As Way to Cut Spiraling Student Loan Debt
This article originally appear on AIA National's website.  To see it in its original context, click here.
 
Washington, D.C. – March 12, 2014 – The American Institute of Architects (AIA) and the American Institute of Architecture Students (AIAS) today committed to timely passage of the National Design Services Act (NDSA), which will give architecture students the same relief from crushing student loan debt, already granted to young lawyers, doctors and others – in return for community service. The bipartisan legislation, H.R. 4205, was introduced Tuesday by Rep. Ed Perlmutter (D-CO) and co-sponsored by Rep. Greg Meeks (D-NY), Rep. Gwen Moore (D-WI) and Rep. Dennis Ross (R-FL) 
 
“Millions of young people aspire to help their communities build a better future – but a lack of opportunity and the crushing cost of education hold them back,” said AIA CEO Robert Ivy, FAIA. “As a result, the design and construction industry faces a severe shortage of talent at exactly the moment America needs to rebuild for the future.
 
“We commend Congressman Perlmutter for recognizing this issue, for introducing the NDSA and for enlisting his colleagues on both sides of the aisle to work for its ultimate passage,” Ivy said. “I promise that they will have the full resources of the AIA as well as the architecture student community behind them when more than 600 AIA members convene in Washington, D.C. next week as part of the AIA’s annual grassroots conference.”
 
"The National Design Services Act will help promote sustainable economic development and jobs by ensuring aspiring architects are able to gain valuable experience while giving back to their communities designing public projects such as schools, health clinics, housing facilities and libraries,” said Rep. Perlmutter. “In return, the bill will alleviate some of the barriers new students face as they pursue their dreams in architecture." 
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EVENT | EPC Joint Meeting with CSI

Specifications 101 - Introduction to Specification Basics

Tuesday, April 8, 2014 | 6:30pm-9:00pm | 1.5 hours of HSW Learning Units | VisTaTech Center (Room VT 460), Schoolcraft College, 18600 Haggerty Road, Livonia

Seminar Description:  The purpose of this presentation is to introduce and educate emerging professionals to the concept of technical specifications as part of a design professional's responsibility in preparing Contract Documents. The purpose, structure and formatting of specifications, relative to MasterFormat, SectionFormat and PageFormat will be presented in detail. Material and product suppliers will also be present to showcase various products, according to specification divisional structuring to also provide a visual connection to the information being presented. The program will consist of a one and one-half hour technical presentation by lead specification personnel from local established architectural/engineering firms followed by a half-hour interactive product display portion.

An attendee of the presentation should leave the seminar with an improved ability to identify and generally understand the following content objectives:

  • Overview the history and evolution of technical specifications and their role and importance to Contract Documents.
  • Review the current industry structure and formatting of technical specifications as it relates to MasterFormat, SectionFormat and PageFormat.
  • Dissect example specification sections and discuss/review the coordination of technical specifications in the greater context of Contract Documents.
  • Relate the content of example technical specifications to actual products, materials, systems and assemblies to establish a better understanding as to the breadth of variety available and why specifications help to establish a desired level of quality.

This is event is free for all AIA Members and Associate members.  Check back here soon for the registration information!

Other Industry Events

ASID Holiday Hoedown Dec 6th

Join the Michigan chapter of the American Society of Interior Designers on December 6th for a holiday party. Put on your best western wear and mosey on down for a good time, celebrating the Holidays with friends and colleagues. Includes a building tour of Inalfa Roofing Systems, Appetizers, Refreshments, and Raffle Items. For more information, click here.

 

Guest commentary: Listen to the people turn unused land into upbeat plans

This is the first of an occasional series of guest columns about the challenges that Detroit's vacant land poses and strategies to find uses for it.

Jazz, Motown, pop, rock, techno, hip hop -- it goes without saying that Detroit has a rich music history. Our music has always reflected our great city. Perhaps now our great city can reflect a piece of our music. We need a little syncopation.

In music, syncopation means to take weak, less dominant musical notes, and make them stronger. In Detroit, something akin to this process has been happening organically over several decades.

As the vibrant economy of the mid-20th Century has been weakening, new forces of change have emerged -- residents, churches, community associations, nonprofits and others have taken it upon themselves to start shifting us away from the status quo.

Through the process of Detroit Works Project Long Term Planning, we can work together to guide the shift to become a city that works better for our entire community. We can create a syncopated Detroit that will amplify the weaker notes, giving them room to grow, and reinforce a new balanced city that builds on our greatest asset, the people of Detroit.

When it comes to land use, the single family home and the large industrial site were the dominant urban notes of 20th Century Detroit. We already know that with the losses in population and industry, these land uses have given way to vacancy. Surveys suggest that there are approximately 20 to 40 square miles of undesignated open space (i.e., vacant land and buildings) within Detroit's 139 square miles. This range spans almost the size of Manhattan (22.9 square miles) to nearly the size of San Francisco (46.9 square miles).

The question has always been: What do we do with this land? DWP Long Term Planning suggests we need to analyze data, but also look to Detroiters for guidance. For years, they have been creatively using this land like a musician composes a song. They have been taking the weaker notes that exist in our city and making them stronger by transforming them into the sites for community spaces, festivals, art parks, rain water collection, markets and urban gardens and farms. For example, the residents of Brightmoor transformed a one-story single family home into a stage for an outdoor theater.

All land has value -- social value and cultural value, in addition to economic value. Throughout the city of Detroit, people are innovatively using the vacant land and illustrating it as an asset versus a liability. They are creating productive landscapes -- spaces that engage the public while also enabling a diverse economy of products and services.

The result is a new land use where something is made, a service is provided, the environment is healed, jobs are created, and people have a place to play.

 

Detroit Works Project Long Term Planning wants to strategically take these emerging notes and make them stronger and, in turn, build a 21st Century equitable and ecological city for all people -- a richer Detroit for Detroiters.

Dan Pitera is executive director of the Detroit Collaborative Design Center at the University of Detroit Mercy and the Detroit Works Project's Long Term Planning Civic Engagement Lead.

Full Article Compliments of The Detroit Free Press Here: http://www.freep.com/article/20120401/OPINION05/204010483/Guest-commentary-?odyssey=mod|newswell|text|Opinion|s

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